Posts tagged ‘reading’

Homework. Swimming. Riding. Saxophone. Friends. Family time. Dinner. Homework. Bedtime Story. Sleep. Add in there a bit of laughter, play, riding bikes with siblings, and chores, and you have the makings of a very busy tween.

Does any of this sound familiar?

This past January, many thousands of families across North America received a Barefoot Book in their Citrus Lane box, much to the delight of their children. Citrus Lane provides monthly boxes to help parents support their children’s learning and have fun at the same time.

In today’s interview, we’re pleased to share some insights from Mauria Finley, Founder and CEO of Citrus Lane. The synergies between our companies are many, including a commitment to sparking children’s imaginations; providing high-quality content that delights children and adults alike; and supporting an entrepreneurial, creative community that has families at its heart. Our books will be surprising Citrus Lane subscribers in the near future ­— the fun didn’t stop in January! If you’re interested in learning more or joining the Citrus Lane community, you can visit their site at

A penniless man passes a street vendor. All he has to eat is a crust of bread he has picked up from the street. From the vendor’s cooking pots wafts a delicious aroma. The man stops to soften his bread in the steam, only to find the vendor’s hand on his shoulder. As far as the vendor is concerned, the poor man should be paying to let the steam add flavour his bread.

Neil Griffiths is known around the world for his exceptional storytelling skills. A former headteacher and the founder of Storysacks, he is in constant demand as a presenter. Here, he shares some of the ways in which he turns children into happy, hungry-for-more readers. We hope his tips inspire you to pick up your child, race to the nearest bookshelf, choose a book, find a quiet corner, and sit down to read together.

For more than 100 years, people have been giving books to loved ones as gifts. Books are a wonderfully thoughtful way to thoughtfully tell someone you care. When you inscribe the books and wrap them up with add a personal message, the lucky recipients will enjoy complimentary goodies to enjoy with the book (think hot chocolate), and remember you every time they open the book.

It is always fascinating to follow the journeys books make once they have come into the world. One thing you can guarantee in advance is that their journeys will be unpredictable.

I am a fan of audio books. When my children were small, the voice of Sir Michael Hordern narrating The Chronicles of Narnia transformed long car journeys, keeping all of us spellbound. So did the voice of Hugh Lupton narrating Tales of Wisdom and Wonder and, later, The Adventures of Odysseus. This weekend, my driving was made infinitely more pleasurable by having Sophie Thompson’s narration of Emma to hold my attention.  And it came as no surprise recently when a friend who reads The Economist told me that the audio version of this newspaper has become far more popular than the print edition.

A big thank you to everyone who responded to my recent blogpost on homework. I spent last week ill in bed with flue and during this time I was very interested to hear that Francois Holland, President of France, has just put a ban on homework. His argument is that ‘an education program is, by definition, a societal program. Work should be done at school, rather than at home.’

As I drove home to Somerset from Oxford last Friday, there was a lively debate on the radio about the merits and demerits of assigning homework to children at infant school.

On the author blog Picture Book Den Juliet Clare Bell shares how Cinnamon Stitch went from being a misreading of an advertisement to the feisty tomboy in The Kite Princessread her post here!