Posts tagged ‘multicultural’


Telling a story without a book as a safety net can seem very scary, but it’s a wonderful way to share a story. So if you have a favourite Barefoot fairy tale or animal fable or goddess myth here’s how to go about sharing it with an audience of children:


 

Ambassador Amanda Taylor shares her experience at the World of Music, Arts and Dance (WOMAD) Festival in Wiltshire, UK. She shared stories and enjoyed a wonderful weekend of art, dance and music!


Hole in the Bottom of the Sea

Image via farhanazam015

When I signed up to take Tropical Ecology as an undergraduate at Loyola University New Orleans, I had no idea that the final exam would be a two-week trip to Belize. Imagine my surprise on the first day of class as my professor, Dr. Bob, explained that we’d be spending time at a jaguar sanctuary, in a modern Mayan village and on an uninhabited island in the Caribbean to learn first-hand about the flora and fauna of the tropics. I packed up my dad’s old yellow hiking backpack with sunscreen and bathing suits and got ready to explore Belize.


The mission statement that runs in all of our books says, “At Barefoot Books, we celebrate art and story that opens the hearts and minds of children from all walks of life.” Our content team is passionately committed to creating books that are inclusive for children of all races, genders, abilities and backgrounds. So when we saw a call for papers about diversity, inclusion and equality in children’s literature, we were all over it!


We Barefoot editors refer to our book projects as our babies. So you can imagine how proud I am to have just brought a trio of beautiful book babies into the world! I had the privilege of working with an incredible team—storytellers Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden, illustrator Carole Hénaff, and editor-in-chief Tessa Strickland—to create our brand-new Greek Myths series. Want to learn a little bit more about how we brought these ancient myths to life for a young audience? Read on for some fun behind-the-scenes tidbits.


Our newest independent reader series is based on stories from Greek mythology, retold by master storytellers Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden and illustrated by Carole Hénaff. The creative process to take text to vivid illustrations is a fascinating one. We are delighted to share an interview with Carole and an introduction by Editor-in-Chief Tessa Strickland.


I first read the story of Theseus and the Minotaur in an issue of the children’s weekly comic, ‘Look and Learn’. I must have been about eight years old. I was both fascinated and appalled by it – fascinated by the culture of ancient Crete and appalled by the behaviour of Theseus, who abandons Ariadne on the island of Naxos, having promised to take her back to Athens and make her his wife. I was also dismayed by Theseus’s  carelessness: when he sets sail from Athens to Crete, determined to kill the minotaur, his father Aegus asks him to have the ship’s black sails changed for white ones if he succeeds in his quest. Theseus forgets, so when his father, anxiously looking out for him, sees a black-sailed ship returning, he throws himself off the cliffs in despair. In ‘Look and Learn’, this scene was dramatically illustrated, with the figure of Aegeus, who gave his name to the Aegean Sea, tumbling to his death as the ship approaches the harbour.


In The Girl with a Brave Heart, Shiraz befriends an old woman by helping to tidy her house, clean up her garden and comb her hair. The story takes place in Tehran, the capital of Iran, formerly known as Persia. Colourful, intricately painted tiles decorated the floors and walls of houses, palaces and houses of worship in this part of the world. In this activity, you will create your own mosaic tile inspired by The Girl with a Brave Heart and traditional Persian tiles.


Photo from http://letsgorideabike.com/blog/2010/03/first-bud-of-spring/

The Iranian origins of our first new book for 2013, The Girl with a Brave Heart, have set the Barefoot Books offices abuzz about all things Iranian. This is a special time of year for the Iranian peoples. Nowruz, the Persian New Year, will fall on 20 March 2013. This date marks the first day of spring and the first day of the Iranian calendar. The holiday has been celebrated for over three thousand years, and is now observed in many countries all over the world.


The Girl with a Brave Heart

When a new baby arrives, we fall in love with all of their perfect little details. We count their tiny fingers and toes, coo over their perfect little lashes, and smooch the chubby rolls of baby fat on their arms and legs. It’s no different when our book babies first arrive in the Barefoot Books offices!