Posts tagged ‘illustrator’


Creating art for a book starts with sketches in a small journal I always have with me.

I think of the characters and how they could be dressed, then decide on a time period for the style of the costumes and the setting, whether it’s the 18th century, 19th or a mixture of time.


The crew at Barefoot Books is coming together and everyone is making paper boats to celebrate the release of Starlight Sailor in a new format—a large board book! Use these easy-to-follow instructions to join the crew and make your own paper boat, then share your nautical creations with us by tagging @BarefootBooks and #paperboat on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. If you’re in the neighborhood of our Oxford, UK or Concord, MA studios this month, stop by and make a paper boat for our maritime displays!


We Barefoot editors refer to our book projects as our babies. So you can imagine how proud I am to have just brought a trio of beautiful book babies into the world! I had the privilege of working with an incredible team—storytellers Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden, illustrator Carole Hénaff, and editor-in-chief Tessa Strickland—to create our brand-new Greek Myths series. Want to learn a little bit more about how we brought these ancient myths to life for a young audience? Read on for some fun behind-the-scenes tidbits.


Our newest independent reader series is based on stories from Greek mythology, retold by master storytellers Hugh Lupton and Daniel Morden and illustrated by Carole Hénaff. The creative process to take text to vivid illustrations is a fascinating one. We are delighted to share an interview with Carole and an introduction by Editor-in-Chief Tessa Strickland.


If you download our Singalongs from Youtube, you will already know that the most popular one is Driving My Tractor, written and composed by Jan Dobbins. Farms may be far away from the everyday lives of many of us, but they retain a considerable allure for small children. I grew up in rural Yorkshire, with calves and sheep, chickens and piglets among my playmates, so I feel a certain nostalgic delight about this project, as well as a debt of gratitude to author and composer Jan Dobbins for having conjured up another compelling tune. I was dismayed last summer to read in the Daily Mail that most teenagers have no idea where butter comes from. As for bacon – a third don’t know it has anything to do with pigs and 3 percent think it comes from cows. You won’t be surprised to hear that many don’t know where eggs or milk come from either.


Most of the books we publish at Barefoot are developed in house, but every now and then I find one on another publisher’s programme and think ‘This is a Barefoot story!’ I came across The Girl with a Brave Heart last year, at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. It had been published in Hebrew by Kinneret Zmora-Bitan Publishing and luckily for me, no-one had snapped up the English language rights.


A penniless man passes a street vendor. All he has to eat is a crust of bread he has picked up from the street. From the vendor’s cooking pots wafts a delicious aroma. The man stops to soften his bread in the steam, only to find the vendor’s hand on his shoulder. As far as the vendor is concerned, the poor man should be paying to let the steam add flavour his bread.


 

On 10 February, Chinese New Year celebrations began across the world. This year, we welcome the Year of the Snake. The fifteenth and final day of the celebration is commemorated with the YUAN XIAO JIE, or the Festival of Lanterns. Children and adults carry lanterns in a parade during a full moon. Learn how to make your own lantern to light up the sky on the final day of Chinese New Year celebrations, 25 February!


Here at the Barefoot Books Studios we love to read My Mama Earth, so it was only natural that we incorporated some of the great watercolour illustrations into an inspired craft. Read on for instructions on how to make your own tropical fish with brilliant features.


It is always fascinating to follow the journeys books make once they have come into the world. One thing you can guarantee in advance is that their journeys will be unpredictable.