Posts tagged ‘children’


Last month we shared with you the exciting news about Micha Archer, illustrator of Lola’s Fandango and The Wise Fool, and her magical decorations for a 10 foot tall Christmas tree, bringing Lola’s story to life. True to the story, big sister Clementina makes an appearance on the tree as well.


Jackie drawing Barefoot Books blog beach farm house

Illustration by Jackie Morris

Everyone knows that the best ideas happen in the kitchen. The kitchen at Beach Farm House saw lots of action. It was a cosy, narrow room with a small, electric cooker, a stainless steel sink and  a fridge running along one side. Above these ran a long, narrow storage shelf.  On the opposite wall was an electric storage heater, around which Francis, Rollo and Zoë would jostle for heat between meals. Unless the wood-burning stove in the sitting room was alight, the kitchen was the warmest room in the house, so this is where my meetings with interesting artists and writers took place. Here you can see the kitchen rendered in blue ink by Jackie Morris, the fantastic illustrator of The Greatest Gift,  Classic Poems and Starlight Sailor.


Blog_JenniferWaldon

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Waldon

Adults aren’t the only ones who feel the stress of the busy holiday season. Between parties, entertaining, shopping, wrapping, decorating, hosting visitors, baking, and other festivities that go along with the winter season, it can be exhausting even to think about, never mind take part in!


Princess of Springs Blog

Illustration by Martina Peluso from the upcoming The Princess of the Springs

American academic Jack Zipes is what a British newspaper calls the ‘Merlin of folklore studies.’  He has spent his life stepping inside stories and has written and edited scores of books, including The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales and The Norton Anthology of Children’s Literature. He is passionate about fairy tales, their meaning and their importance. He believes in the power of fairy tales to hold up a mirror to our lives and show us ‘the gaps between truth and falsehood in our immediate society.’ Like all of us at Barefoot, Jack is convinced that story is not a commodity or entertainment but a means to explore and express ideas. So how lucky a few of the Barefoot Books Oxford office’s editorial team felt when we had the chance to listen to him talk at the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education (CLPE) in London.


Ah . . . there are few things that bring back memories more strongly than smell.  Here are some of my favorites, from the festival of Hanukkah, the Jewish holiday that starts tonight and celebrates the miracle of oil lasting long enough to rebuild the Temple during the 2nd century BCE:


Spin, twirl and dazzle with these Jolly Paper Twirlies! Decorate your home for the season and create a winter wonderland for your family to enjoy. This craft is fairly easy, but make sure to help youngsters with some of the more difficult steps. Read on to see lots of photographs and learn how to make three kinds of Twirlies. It’s amazing what you can make with just seven pieces of paper!


The 18th Annual Family Trees: A Celebration of Children’s Literature at the Concord, Massachusetts Museum is quickly approaching! This year, the wonderful illustrator of Lola’s Fandango, Micha Archer, has the great honor of decorating the main tree at the exhibit. The Family Trees exhibit will be open from November 27 – January 1 and all proceeds benefit the Concord Museum’s education initiatives. If you’re in the New England area this season, bring the whole family to see Micha’s tree and dozens of others inspired by children’s stories!  If you’re not in the area, please share with those who are, it’s a real treat for children’s book lovers.


Photo courtesy of Bankstreet Bookstore

In a tiny village, in a valley, high in the mountains of Tibet, a little boy was born. He loved to fly kites. On clear nights he liked to look up at the Milky Way and the stars. “There are other worlds up there,” he said to himself. “Someday I’m going to visit them…” So begins the story of The Mountains of Tibet, one of the first books published by Barefoot Books back in 1993.


Creating art for a book starts with sketches in a small journal I always have with me.

I think of the characters and how they could be dressed, then decide on a time period for the style of the costumes and the setting, whether it’s the 18th century, 19th or a mixture of time.


 

photo credit: Mamatography

We are very excited that our Ambassador, Barbara Saunders Sims, M.Ed. will be a guest storytelling expert at a free webinar hosted by Bright Horizons Family Solutions – Reading Aloud With Children: The Art of Bringing Books to Life Through Storytelling. You can register to attend the webinar on November 5  at 8:00 pm ET by visiting this page.