Posts tagged ‘barefoot books’


Five Reasons to Become a Barefoot Books Ambassador this February | Barefoot Books

Join in February to get The Girl with a Brave Heart in our Love & Acceptance Set!

Are you looking for a new opportunity to learn and grow? To open children’s hearts and minds with multicultural books they’ll love to read? To be recognized for all your hard work? To make a big impact on families in your community…and beyond? If so, you’re in the right place!

Flexible and fun, with no minimums or hidden fees, the Barefoot Books Ambassador Program empowers you to run your business your way, to pursue your own goals–and get great discounts on the books you love!

This February is a fabulous time to start your Barefoot journey! Here’s why:

  1. Five Reasons to Become a Barefoot Books Ambassador this February | Barefoot Books

    Good friends + great conversations + gorgeous books = a Barefoot event!

    Join before February 29th to receive 6 of our favorite books…in addition to the Starter Kit! This month, we’re sending each new joiner our Love & Acceptance Set - consider it our Valentines’ Day gift to you! Including The Girl with a Brave Heart (pictured above), The Boy who Grew Flowers, and other Barefoot favorites, this hand-picked, multicultural selection of stories about compassion and confidence will perfectly complement your Starter Kit. These 6 books will give you an extra edge as you launch your business and begin to make a difference in children’s lives!

  2. Double Host rewards: If you’re worried that you’ll have trouble convincing people to book events in this cooooooooold month, don’t be! Everyone is looking for ways to stave off the cabin fever. You’ll have plenty of eager hosts chomping at the bit to hold Barefoot Books events at their homes–especially with our special Double Host rewards! Such a can’t miss Host special makes it all the easier for you to land bookings right away and get your business off to a great start.

    Five Reasons to Become a Barefoot Ambassador in February | Barefoot Books

    The opportunity is completely flexible, so you can achieve YOUR dreams YOUR way!

  3. Reading Resolutions: This February, we’re challenging families to stick to the Reading Resolutions they made in January. As an Ambassador, you can use our buy 3, get 4th free consumer offer to enable families to get more books for less cash! Our Children’s Literacy Workshop event theme pairs perfectly with this offer. Plus, we’ve created fresh new content about children’s literacy — check out our blog posts on why you shouldn’t pressure kids to learn to read early and the visual literacy benefits of wordless books. They’re perfect for reminding a potential hostess of her treasured dream of seeing the children in her life grow and thrive.

  4. Speaking of dreams…what are yours? You can use the Ambassador program specifically to help you achieve the personal growth YOU want to see in your life. If you long to conquer a new challenge or gain recognition for your skills; to step outside your comfort zone or inspire others to do so; or to pay for a family vacation or pay off student debt, our supportive Ambassador community and expert training will equip you to reach YOUR goals.
    Five Reasons to Become a Barefoot Ambassador this February | Barefoot Books

  5. Lastly, and most importantly, becoming an Ambassador is a decision you can feel great about. When you become an Ambassador, you join a community passionate about sharing stories, connecting families and inspiring children. You share beautiful, educational and inclusive books and products with your community; and in doing so, nurture a love of storytelling, creativity and diversity that empowers children to see the world in a whole new light.

Are you ready to begin your Barefoot journey? We at Home Office are so excited to help you reach toward YOUR dreams and can’t wait to see what you achieve!

 

 


Four Ways to Celebrate Chinese New Year with Kids | Barefoot Books

Welcome to the Year of the Monkey! According to lunar astrological calendar, every year in a twelve-year cycle is ruled by a different animal—and as of Lunar New Year on Monday, February 8, 2016, the monkey is in charge! The monkey’s place in the Lunar Zodiac was established in the mists of time, when the Jade Emperor decided that a different animal should rule each year and, to determine the order of the animals, challenged them all to an epic race. The monkey finished ninth, earning it the ninth place in the Lunar Zodiac. If you were born in 1944, 1956, 1968, 1980, 1992 or 2004, this is your year. You’re known for being happy, confident and enthusiastic, no matter what place you finish in any race!

Cherished in China, Korea and beyond, Lunar New Year is a great way to introduce the children in your life to another culture’s traditions. Here are a few kid-approved ideas for celebrating Lunar New Year:

Ways to Celebrate Chinese New Year with Kids | Barefoot Books

From The Great Race

Have a Lavish New Year’s Eve Dinner

Traditionally, the festival opens with a lavish New Year’s Eve dinner held in honor of deceased ancestors. This meal is a time for all living family members to come together with the deceased, creating a united community to celebrate past and present generations.

In the past, family members filled bamboo stems with gunpowder and burned them to drive evil spirits away; today, people use firecrackers instead. Each is rolled in red paper, as the color red is considered lucky.


Send Letters to Loved Ones in Red Envelopes

The use of red extends to red envelopes or red packets that are traditionally passed out during the celebrations. The packets almost always contain money­— sometimes chocolate coins— and the amount is always given in even numbers. The number eight, for instance, is considered lucky, as is the number six, because in Mandarin it sounds like the word for “smooth,” promising a smooth year.

Ways to Celebrate Chinese New Year with Kids | Barefoot Books

From Lin Yi's Lantern

Make a Paper Lantern

The fifteenth and final day of the celebration is commemorated with the Yuan Xiao Jie, or the “Festival of Lanterns.” Gathering under a full moon, adults and children light up the sky with their lantern displays and a lantern-carrying parade. Like the children in the photo above, learn how to make a paper lantern in the informational notes in Lin Yi’s Lantern, a gorgeously-illustrated Barefoot tale from China!

Share a Story to Learn More About the Culture!

Research shows that children (and grown-ups!) often draw incorrect conclusions about other cultures. In order to help children challenge stereotypes and develop global literacy, it’s important for adults to educate themselves and correct their own misconceptions. It’s easy to get started: just share stories from other cultures with the children in your life. It’s a great way to prompt conversations about diversity!

Keen to explore East Asian cultures? You’ll experience the excitement of a rural market in Lin Yi’s Lantern (ages 5-9), discover the warmth and wisdom of Buddhist thought in The Barefoot Book of Buddhist Tales (ages 6+) and meet “The Beggar Princess” in The Barefoot Book of Princes Stories (ages 4-9).

And, of course, be sure to watch the Jade Emperor’s epic race unfold—and find out why there is no Year of the Cat—in The Great Race: The Story of the Chinese Zodiac (ages 4-9). Find additional tales from China and beyond here!

Ways to Celebrate Chinese New Year with Kids | Barefoot Books

Want more ideas?

For more information on the traditions and customs of Lunar New Year, and for recipes and crafts you can make with the children in your life, check out our Pinterest board!

Want to find out which animal you are? Download a Lunar Calendar from The Great Race to use in your classroom, for fun at home or as a festive desktop wallpaper!

Do you have any Lunar New Year traditions? What is your Lunar zodiac animal? Share your stories in the comments below or on Facebook or Twitter!

 


 

Barefoot Ambassador Jessica Romick has been hard at work in the kitchen creating a tasty new recipe that is sure to warm your tummy as the chilly winter air approaches. This stew contains a variety of savory vegetables including turnips (of course!), potatoes, carrots, and more! Jessica was kind enough to write to us about her new creation that is inspired by the The Gigantic Turnip by Aleksei Tolstoy and Niamh Sharkey. She writes:

I recently began sharing a story time with the homeschooling cooperative my four-year-old son is a member of. It’s been such a joy to read [Barefoot's] beautiful books to the children and see the excitement on their faces when I pull out a new book or a puppet. We’ve discussed the changing of the seasons with Listen, Listen; we’ve learned about dinosaurs through I Dreamt I Was a Dinosaur; and we’ve enjoyed learning how children around the world say “Hello!” using the Children of the World matching game.

In September, I shared one of my favorite stories—The Gigantic Turnip—and wanted to bring the story to life for the children in a unique way. I began looking around Pinterest to see if any other ambassadors (or anyone) had created a Gigantic Turnip Stew like the one mentioned at the end of the book. To my surprise, I found nothing! I hunted around for other recipes that focused on root vegetables and then set about creating my own take on what a Gigantic Turnip Stew would be.

After several trials I’m happy to share my recipe here with you. It has become my favorite fall meal (I’m eating a bowl of it right now as I write this)! Feel free to share this recipe with your friends, family, and clients. Bon Appetite!

Download Jessica’s “Gigantic Turnip Stew” recipe here!

Curl up with a copy of The Gigantic Turnip while eating a this delicious stew!

Find out what happens when the old woman, the old man, and all twenty-one animals on the farm try to harvest a rather large root vegetable. This well-loved Russian tale uses humor, counting and repetition to appeal to beginner readers. Book with CD editions include story read by Ellen Verenieks.

The Blue Ribbon Book
The Bulletin for the Center of Children’s Books
ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award Finalist
Books for Children, Mother Goose Award Winner
Children’s Book Council NOT Just for Children Anymore! Winner

 

If you would like one of your Barefoot-inspired creations to be featured on the Living Barefoot blog, message us on Facebook!

 


Every year, Barefoot Books selects one of their beloved illustrators to decorate the main tree at a local fundraising event*. With an emphasis on art in all that Barefoot does, our tree is a reflection of the creativity and imagination that runs through all our books. This year Rachel Griffin, illustrator of the brand-new Twelve Days of Christmas, is designing original ornaments based on her book and will be travelling all the way from England to celebrate this special event with us! Rachel’s artistic style includes hand-sewn fabric collage illustrations made from a variety of different materials and vibrant colors. Unlike most versions of Twelve Days of Christmas, she incorporates imagery from various cultures including pipers from India and drummers from Africa. Her artwork and new take on the classic story makes this the perfect book for the holiday season!

The brilliantly gifted artist is hard at work creating her decorations for this year’s Twelve Days of Christmas tree and graciously shared with us some insight into her creative process.

Where do you get your inspiration?

My inspiration comes from books, museums, art galleries and my magpie eye always on the lookout for inspiring images.

There is so much detail in your artwork, what has the process been like for you creating these decorations?

The process has been quite straightforward forward as I am using the book I illustrated as a reference to work from, the visual and color scheme work had been done so it is just about using inspiration from the book to come up with 3-D images for each verse. I have sketched out the elements from each verse and created patterns for the birds and hearts, they seem to come together as I am sitting at my desk creating. I have all the materials I need for each verse laid out on my desk and by the time I have finished every inch of my studio is covered with materials: sequins, beads, etc.

Your art features many different materials, where do you find such interesting pieces? Which are your favorite to work with?

I find all my collections of material from travelling, going to antique markets, charity shops, and unusual shops in cities. I never buy online as part of my process is in the collecting and finding. On this project I have found some amazing wool felt which is a dream to work with and the colors are amazing.

How is decorating a Christmas tree different from illustrating a book? How is it similar?

It is very similar to how I work on my illustrations as they are 3-D, so working on the decorations has been a natural progression for me. The only difference is that it’s trying to create each verse in the same way so they hang well
together, whereas in the book they stand on their own on each page.

Do you have a favorite ornament so far?

Three French hens — I love the colors I have used and the 3-D images I have thought of to go with the three fat French Hens!

*Each year, the Concord Museum located in Concord, MA fills its galleries with over thirty uniquely decorated trees featuring artwork inspired by acclaimed children’s storybooks. If you’re in the area between November 25 through January 3, be sure to check out the exhibit for yourself! For more information about Family Trees or the Concord Museum visit www.concordmuseum.org.

Read the book that inspired the decorations!

Twelve Days of Christmas

A sparkling version of the popular Christmas song, in a new edition embossed with silvery-gold foiling and beautiful fabric illustrations by Rachel Griffin. This book includes an insightful note from the illustrator, information about the celebration of the Twelve Days of Christmas (history, including the pre-Christian tradition, and customs), and the history and meaning of the song itself.

For babies to 10 years; Hardcover ($14.99)

 


A spooky fruit and gelatin recipe straight from Dracula’s kitchen. Wash your hands before you start! Always have a grown-up in the kitchen with you when you cook. Ages 8 and up.

QUANTITY Makes 3–4 small glasses (tubs)

MATERIALS

• 1¼ oz packet unflavored gelatin (enough to set 2½ cups liquid); For a vegetarian version, use agar-agar, following the instructions on packet

• 1½ cups blueberries or blackberries, or any fruit you wish

• 2¼ cups dark red or blue berry juice (e.g. blueberry or cranberry)

• ¼ cups boiling water

KITCHEN STUFF

• Mixing bowl

• Measuring cup

• Teapot

• Tablespoon

• Containers (for gelatin)

LET’S BEGIN

1. Wash the fruit and pat dry with a paper towel.

2. Put the gelatin into the measuring cup. Pour ¼ cup boiling water over the gelatin and stir carefully with a spoon, to dissolve it.

3. Add the berry juice to the dissolved gelatin so that it fills the measuring cup up to 2½ cups.

4. Divide the fruit between the containers and pour the gelatin mixture over the fruit.

5. Put Dracula’s gelatin in the fridge for about 45 minutes to set.

Tip: Add more fruit than gelatin for set fruit.

The recipe shown in the picture is of Cran-Grape juice gelatin with blackberries. Yum! Download this fun Hallowe’en recipe and more here.

Looking for more fun in the kitchen?

Encourage budding chefs to create tasty meals with 40 laminated recipe cards that feature nutritious vegetarian dishes from around the world. Unique recipes ranging from the familiar to the exotic are divided into five color-coded categories to reflect the major food groups. Simple step-by-step instructions put kids in control as they learn that cooking is more than an art — it’s a science! Includes 8-page booklet with information on nutrition, kitchen safety and terminology. This edition has been updated with even tastier recipes.


Celebrate Earth Day 2015 with us – and your children – on April 22nd!

We only get one planet and it’s important to us that we treat Earth with the respect and care it deserves. We practice environmentally and socially conscious business and printing practices to personally reduce our footprint on the environment and we’ve found that practicing sustainability as a company promotes practicing sustainability individually.

The same can be true for your family! We create books that promote a culture of sustainability, green living, and a consciousness of our impact on the environment. It’s important to teach kids how they can help the planet – and these books can help. Here are our suggestions for some of our top books to share with your little ones on this important day:

Whole World

This book, accompanied by a sing along CD, reimagines the classic children’s song “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands” and contextualizes it for a modern, global audience. After reading this book, your children will feel inspired knowing that all people from all walks of life across the globe care for the environment together. We believe that it’s important to show that all cultures and people are equally invested in protecting the environment. (Buy: North America / Europe)

What’s This? A Seed’s Story

What’s more poignant than a young girl stumbling upon a seed, helping it grow throughout all of spring, and then sharing the seeds with her classmates so they can all plant sunflowers together the following spring? What’s This? will teach the values of patience and generosity just in time for children to start planting their own flowers! (Buy: North America / Europe)

The Barefoot Book of Earth Tales

To inspire children to care about the environment, it’s incredibly important to introduce them to Earth as a friend. As with any friendships, telling stories is how friendships grow. Earth Tales introduces children to many different myths and legends surrounding the creation of Earth and why things are the way they are. From Wales to Kazakhstan, many cultures are featured in this wonderful anthology of stories.
(Buy: North America / Europe)

Want to take your education a bit further? Consider doing one of these activities afterwards:

1. Skip the drive and instead walk to school, the grocery store, or the park

2. Have your child identify the recycling symbol on containers in your home and make a game out of putting them in your recycling bin

3. Plant a seed and watch as it grows – soon you’ll be able to plant it in the ground outside

4. Make signs to remind family members to turn off lights or the faucet when not in use

No matter how you choose to celebrate, teaching kids about Earth Day will be fun, educational, and a chance to make an impact on our planet. Show us how you are celebrating! Share your photos with us on our Barefoot Books Facebook page!


Are you looking for a fun craft to create with your children this festive season? All you need is some felt, card, ribbon and glue to make these simple decorations in the shape of a bird, dreidel, star and tree.


Last week, I went to a neuroscience-meets-psychology seminar in London about infant-parent relationships. It was delightful to be reminded how even the smallest babies are ready and eager to engage with the adults in their world and to tune into what is being shared with them. In the wake of this experience, I was very happy earlier this week to read the news from the American Association of Pediatrics that it will now be a requirement for health professionals to give guidance to young parents of the value of reading to their new babies.


 

You’ve probably heard the term “brain drain” tossed around in the media. What is it? Is it a real phenomenon?


Out of the Blue Activity | Seashell Picture Frame for Kids

In our popular wordless book, Out of the Blue, children comb the beach for seashells and other treasures, which they then use to create art. Where do seashells come from? How many different types of seashells are there? In this activity, learn fascinating facts about seashells, work on early math skills with sorting games and create a beautiful, beachy keepsake.

About Out of the Blue

This evocative wordless book about the mysteries of the sea invites readers to tell the story in their own words, which stimulates the imagination and helps develop visual literacy. Follow Alison Jay’s distinctive crackle-varnished artwork as a storm — and what it brings — transforms the seashore for a day.

Includes endnotes on marine life, lighthouses and the intriguing world of items that wash up on beaches. This book suits all ages.