It’s never too early to start taking the first steps toward literacy! Early exposure to language through reading, talking and singing has such a profound influence on children’s learning through life that the American Academy of Pediatrics now requires pediatricians to “prescribe” reading from birth.

So what types of books are best for babies? Here’s our research-based roundup:

Board Books

  • You’ve probably noticed that many books for babies come in this format. Why? Babies are still developing control of their fingers, and the stiff pages are easier to manipulate than paper pages. These sturdy books also withstand mouthing from babies and toddlers, which is a primary way they explore the world. (They do this because the nerve endings in their mouths are more sensitive than those in their fingers at this age!)

High Contrast Books

  • Babies’ developing brains are tasked with processing a lot of information! Research shows that focusing on simple, high-contrast images allows babies’ brains to rest and helps prevent overstimulation. Babies prefer to look at black and white images, bold colors, and photographs of faces.

Books for Active Reading

  • Almost any book can be made interactive, but certain books build it right in to their structure! Look for books that encourage toddlers to seek, count, name objects, answer questions, and make predictions. All of these activities build attention span and critical thinking skills, which are important foundational abilities for later academic learning.

Books with Repeating Text

  • Ever notice that baby books can be kind of….repetitive? This is intentional! Books with predictable, repeating text (often rhyming text) expose babies to the patterns of language and them to anticipate what is coming next. In addition to building vocabulary and memory skills, these books involve children as they grow by empowering them to join you in “reading” the repeated words.

Singalongs

  • Listening to you singing rhyming and repeated text helps build your baby’s early language skills. Plus, many of these songs encourage movement and gross motor practice.

Research also shows that keeping a wide variety of books within children’s reach encourages a love for books and reading. Let them choose what you read from the earliest age, and – most of all – enjoy the time together!


Do Something Grand for Grandparents: Unique Gift Ideas for KidsTo celebrate Grandparent’s Day on September 13, we asked our community for inspiration and ideas for gifts that kids can create or do for grandparents.

We hope you enjoy this fantastic advice from the Barefoot community!

A Fun Take on Flowers:
Team Leader Tiffany says, “It’s always a nice gesture to receive flowers, but given that children love to craft – how about they craft some flowers using tissue paper, glitter, felt, pipe sticks, etc. This way, the grandparents get to keep them all year long!”

An Actual Family Tree:
Work with your child to craft a tree – an actual family tree! This could be great for older kids who can write names and so forth and stick them on the branches. If you want to go 3-D, use family photos on each brand instead.

Musical Memories:
Put together a playlist with songs from their grandparents school years and have a dance party with them. This gift is one that continues to give as kids can dance to this soundtrack all year long when visiting grandparents.

Lasting Communications:
Consider starting a pen pal relationship between grandparent and child, even if they are close by. Snail mail is fun for all ages. Have children write about what they did that day and ask how grandparents used to spend their day. Ambassador Lisa says, “My kids do it with their great grandmother and both sides love it!”

Send a Hug:
Too far away to see each other? Trace a drawing of your kiddos with arms spread wide onto butcher or rolled paper. Have them decorate with a cute message and mail so that grandparents can have a “hug” whenever needed.

Fun in Video Form:
Kids can create a skit or sing a song for their grandparents and send the video. Or, if you have an early reader, Team Leader Dena suggests having them read a book on video about grandparents and send to share.

What advice do you have for celebrating grandparents?
Please share your ideas in the comments!

Looking for more gift ideas? Meet grandparents of all kinds in these Barefoot stories:

My Granny Went to Market
Fly away with Granny as she takes a magic carpet ride around the world, collecting a steadily increasing number of souvenirs from each exotic location! This rhyming story will take young readers on an adventure to different countries while teaching them to count along the way.

The Journey Home from Grandpa’s
Hop in the yellow car and look out for all the other forms of transportation on the way home from Grandpa’s. A beautiful, double-page spread at the end features all of the colors and modes of transportation from the story.

Give the gift of time together: Include the puzzle for more quality time between child and grandparent!

Grandpa's Garden | Barefoot BooksGrandpa’s Garden
This beautifully told story follows Billy from early spring to late summer as he helps his grandpa on his vegetable patch. They dig the hard ground, sow rows of seeds, and keep them watered and safe from slugs. When harvest time arrives they can pick all the vegetables and fruit they have grown. Children will be drawn in by the poetry of the language and the warm illustrations, while also catching the excitement of watching things grow!

Emily’s Tiger
Watch out – Emily is off and running again! This little girl has a problem with her temper, and every time she gets angry she turns into quite the little tiger. This quirky picture book addresses behavioral issues with humor and an emphasis on intergenerational relationships.

Elephant Dance
Listen along with Ravi to Grandfather’s captivating stories about India, where the sun is like a ferocious tiger and monsoon rains cascade like waterfalls. Notes after the story include facts about India’s animals, food, culture and religion, and a simple elephant dance music score.


Tackle Math with The Real Princess | A Children's Book from Barefoot Books

Math is often a scary monster for kids — difficult and hard to understand, yet crucial in early childhood.

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) agree that an accessible and engaging mathematics education in early childhood is a vital foundation for future mathematical understanding and learning in general.

A lack of confidence and an unwillingness to participate can develop if your child does not become comfortable with math at an early age. This can lead to them believing that they are “bad at math” and thrust them into a self-fulfilling cycle of failure. Research shows that:

  • The brain is most receptive to learning math and logic between the ages of 1 and 4.
  • Success in early math skills also predicts later reading achievement.
  • The most critical brain development occurs in the first few years of life — it is important to capitalize on these early stages to help develop children’s learning abilities.
  • Exploration and curiosity are the foundations of math, science and early learning.

As parents, how can you help engage your child in math while creating an exciting and memorable experience?

An important aspect is compounding fun reading with “hidden” math learning — your child will be having so much fun, they won’t even realize they are learning math! On average, children who are participating in hands-on activities establish a deeper understanding of the concepts and return more readily for future engagement. Tangible representations of numbers and patterns give your child something easy and fun to remember while simultaneously increasing comprehension.

Tackle Math with The Real Princess | A Children's Book from Barefoot BooksA colorful and fantastical twist on The Princess and the Pea, The Real Princess: A Mathemagical Tale (North America | Europe) is a perfect addition to any at-home math encouragement. The book follows the tale of a numerically inclined royal family, and their pursuit to find equally worthy (and math oriented) princesses to marry their sons.  What better way to fight off the math monster than with a brave princess?

Included in the back of the book is an inviting and relevant math activity, that sends you counting back through the book and is guaranteed to keep your child engaged. This counting activity also features an answer sheet, which can be found online: Counting Activity and Answer Key.

That’s not all! Another hands-on activity can be found online to make Princess Collage Feather Beds. This arts and crafts project can be a vibrant memento to hang up as a reminder of all that your child has accomplished and learned from A Mathemagical Tale.

What are you doing to fight the math monster?


Practice Yoga with Kids to Improve Patience and Increase Confidence

Confidence, patience and both mental and physical balance are some of the most important skills for children to learn while they grow, and yet are also some of the most difficult to teach. How can parents even begin to explain such broad and complex concepts, while still keeping their kids engaged? Body and mind awareness can be achieved however, through one all-encompassing activity — yoga!

Experts agree that starting yoga at a young age helps to develop skills that will serve your children their entire lives. Body control and self-induced calmness can soothe tantrums, help fussy bedtimes and make kids more agile and balanced on their feet.

Yoga incorporates play, exercise and connecting with inner feelings all in one! It can teach children how to relieve stress in a healthy and positive way, while also providing a fun and interesting new activity. PBS kids has comprised a few examples of why yoga is so great for kids:

xxxx1. Yoga teaches us about our bodies. When we practice the physical postures or exercises (called asanas), we learn how to move more freely and with greater ease and awareness. These postures help our bodies become strong and flexible. Yoga is also a great way to teach children how to take care of themselves and their bodies! It teaches us to listen to our bodies by modifying or changing poses that are too hard or cause pain.

xxxx2. Yoga teaches us how to use our energy more effectively. When we practice yoga, we learn how to use the life force energy in our bodies (called prana) to feel more relaxed, focused, or motivated. It helps us breathe better too— when we breathe deeply and fully (called pranayama) we become more aware, and we can bring peacefulness or energy to our bodies.

xxxx3. Yoga teaches us how to quiet the mind. When we practice yoga, we learn how to be still. This helps us to listen with attention and make good decisions. As with all forms of exercise, a good yoga practice can mean a good night’s sleep!

xxxx4. Yoga teaches us about balance. When we practice yoga, we learn to be more aware about the need for balance in our lives. This could mean equal stretching on the left and right sides of our bodies or making sure we balance our very busy time with equal quiet time and relaxation.

Having a visual aid is a great tool to help your children easily comprehend and get excited about yoga! Check out some of our yoga oriented products to encourage the namaste lifestyle with your children.

My Daddy is a Pretzel

NAPRA Nautilus award finalist, My Daddy is a Pretzel), is the perfect way to engage kids in yoga. Follow a group of children as they discuss their parent’s occupations, while comparing them to different poses. Each pose emphasizes a certain skill and gives step by step instructions on how to safely achieve them. A light-hearted look at yoga, yet one with a lasting message, My Daddy is a Pretzel is a wonderful introduction to yoga for readers of all shapes and sizes.

Yoga Pretzels

Inspired by the book is the unique card collection of yoga activities, Yoga Pretzels. Featuring 50 different yoga activities for kids and grownups, each card is beautifully illustrated and easy to understand. Pick randomly or follow the color coded categories for partner poses, breathing exercises, balancing and much more!

Yoga CD

Perfect for mediating or practicing your poses, Barefoot’s Yoga CD ) features 14 soothing tracks composed by a diverse group of world renowned artists. Play it while your little ones read before bedtime, or while they are stretching and controlling their breathe with Yoga Pretzels!

Interested in trying this out?
Download 4 FREE activities from our best selling deck, Yoga Pretzels!


Types of Literacy and Why You Should Care | Emotional and Cultural Literacy | Barefoot BooksWhen you hear the word “literacy” what comes to mind?

Most likely, books and the ability to read and write. This type of “book” literacy is hugely important, as we know, but as much as we want our children to be book literate and academically successful, we are also concerned about our children’s character development. What kind of people will they grow up to be? We want them to be caring and socially conscious citizens of the world: self-confident, curious and compassionate.

This is where two additional types of literacy come in: emotional literacy and cultural literacy. We’ve pulled together a list of books that will help you cultivate cultural literacy and a list of books that foster emotional literacy. Many of the books on these lists support both.

And, of course, reading these books with your kids will support “book” literacy as well!

Cultural Literacy and Books to Help

Research shows that children often draw incorrect conclusions about other cultures, and that it’s important for adults to gently correct such misconceptions and challenge stereotypes through open conversation. Sharing diverse stories like these from around the world is a great way to start a conversation about diversity.

My Granny Went to Market (ages 3-7)
This rhyming story will take young readers on an adventure to different countries while teaching them to count along the way.

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush (ages 3-7)
Follow four children from different countries, each going through their early morning routine and getting ready for school. See the different ways of life in Europe, Africa, India and China.

Off We Go To Mexico | Barefoot BooksOff We Go to Mexico (ages 4-10)
Trek to native villages and sing and dance to the music of Mariachi bands. Along the way, you can learn Spanish words and phrases and discover Mexican culture. (Also available in Spanish!)

We’re Sailing Down the Nile (ages 4-10)
Set sail along the mighty Nile River. The rhyming story is followed by eleven pages full of educational information about ancient Egypt, gods and goddesses, a helpful map, and much more.

We All Went on Safari (ages 4-10)
Set out on a counting journey through the grasslands of Tanzania. The lively, rhyming text is accompanied by an illustrated guide to counting in Swahili, a map, notes about animals, and interesting facts about Tanzania and the Maasai people. (Spanish and French formats available!)

The Barefoot Book of Jewish Tales (ages 7+)
This engaging collection includes eight delightful tales from the Jewish tradition. Each story has been chosen for its appeal to families and each has a simple — yet powerful — message.

The Barefoot Book of Buddhist Tales (ages 6+)
Explore numerous tales from the folk traditions of countries including India, China, Japan and Tibet. This is a collection of enthralling stories illustrates various important aspects of Buddhist thought.

The Great Race (ages 4-9)
Race with the animals of the Zodiac as they compete to have the years of the Chinese calendar named after them. The excitement-filled story is followed by notes on the Chinese calendar, important Chinese holidays, and a chart outlining the animal signs based on birth years.

Lin Yi's Lantern | Barefoot BooksLin Yi’s Lantern (ages 5-9)
This heartwarming story shows the rewards of putting others first, and includes educational notes at the end about the Chinese moon festival, life in rural China, and the legend of the moon fairy.

Mama Panya’s Pancakes (ages 4-10)
On market day, Mama Panya’s son Adika invites everyone he sees to a pancake dinner. How will Mama Panya ever feed them all? This clever and heartwarming story about Kenyan village life teaches the importance of sharing, even when you have little to give.

Barefoot Books World Atlas (all ages)
This is the atlas for twenty-first-century readers. It’s packed with information about the way in which communities and cultures around the world have been shaped by their local environments, and it looks at the ideas and initiatives that are shaping the future.

The Barefoot World Atlas app for iPad is also available.

Learn more about our World Cultures books and take the kids in your life on an imaginary journey around the world!

Emotional Literacy and Books to Help

Through books and thoughtful discussions, we can help children feel confident in their unique identities, identify and express their feelings, and develop empathy towards others. Like reading, math or science, emotional literacy can be taught, but it’s not a quick and easy process. This area needs to be addressed regularly, like any other academic area we care about.

Ruby’s Baby Brother (ages 3-7)
Ruby’s mom is having a baby, but Ruby is not very happy about it. When baby
Leon comes along, will she change her mind about having a baby brother? (Available in Spanish!)

Ruby's Sleepover | Barefoot BooksRuby’s Sleepover (ages 3-7)
Ruby and Mai are camping out in the backyard. As the night draws in, all sorts of scary characters head towards their tent. Luckily, Ruby has some magical objects in her backpack, but will they be enough to keep the girls safe and fight their fears?

Emily’s Tiger (ages 3-7)
This little girl has a problem with her temper, and every time she gets angry she turns into quite the little tiger. This quirky picture book addresses behavioral issues with humor and an emphasis on intergenerational relationships.

Herb the Vegetarian Dragon (ages 4-10)
Herb is captured by the castle’s knights in armor. Treacherous Meathook and his dragon cronies will only help if Herb, a vegetarian, agrees to eat meat. Will he give in to their blackmail and bullying?

The Boy Who Grew Flowers (ages 4-10)
Climb to the top of Lonesome Mountain to meet a very special boy named Rink — every full moon, he grows flowers all over his body. This heartwarming story celebrates difference and friendship, as Rink meets a girl with her own secret, and they discover ways to help each other.

Chandra’s Magic Light (ages 6-10)
A heartwarming story set in Nepal of two resourceful sisters who bring the safety of solar-powered light to their family. This story provides an introduction to Nepali village culture, environmental science and feminism.

The Girl with the Brave Heart | Barefoot BooksThe Girl with a Brave Heart (ages 4-10)
Shiraz, a kindhearted young girl growing up in Tehran, has a miserable life at home with her stepmother and stepsister, who treat her like a servant. When the wind blows Shiraz’s ball of wool into the garden next door, she spends the day helping and caring for the old lady who lives there, with miraculous results.

Lola’s Fandango (ages 4-10)
Lola is a young Spanish girl in awe of her glamorous older sister. However, she discovers her own talent and duende, or spirit, through secret fandango lessons from her father. The text is infused with the rhythms, movements and sounds of the dance.

Learn more about our books that boost Social Emotional Learning.

 

Ready to read around the world? Join our Summer Reading Club!


Chandra’s Magic Light Brightens Real World Nepal: After the earthquake in central Nepal, one passionate Barefoot Books Ambassador used Chandra's Magic Light to help those affected.

“The book is a vehicle by which we can help people across the world.”

Chandra’s Magic Light is a beautiful and inspirational read that relays an important message to children of all ages. Set in Nepal, this heartwarming book tells the tale of two resourceful sisters who bring the safety of solar-powered light to their family’s home. The book includes useful facts about Nepal and instructions for a great DIY project: making an easy solar-powered oven!

Chandra's Magic Light from Barefoot Books: A Story from Nepal

After the devastating earthquake in central Nepal, one passionate Barefoot Books Ambassador sought to capitalize on her influence to help those affected by the disaster. With many homes lost along with the use of electricity, Chandra’s Magic Light is perhaps more relevant than ever before and Ambassador Heather Lynn Barton Ziegler immediately made the connection.

The Story

When the earthquake first hit in April, Heather was shocked along with the rest of the world at the widespread damages. A good friend of Heather’s had lived and worked as a peacekeeping ambassador in Nepal and thus the horror struck even closer to home.

An Ambassador since 2009, Heather is used to the driven, interconnected and passionate environment that Barefoot cultivates. Always looking for a way to connect current events to our books, she decided to read Chandra’s Magic Light (Europe / North America) to her daughter after the tragedy occurred. Immediately upon reading it, light bulbs (or solar-powered lights) began flashing in her mind! She jumped into action and brainstormed on how she could help those in need in Nepal by using Chandra’s Magic Light as a connection between the two cultures.

Nepal LuminAid

Heather recalled hearing about LuminAid, a company founded by two young women in response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Upon visiting the LuminAid website, she discovered that they already had a system in place to send durable, waterproof, solar-powered lights to Nepal. Heather calculated that with her Ambassador discount, the price of one copy of Chandra’s Magic Light was equal to the price of donating one light to the Nepali Children’s Education Project (NCEP) through LuminAid. Thus Heather’s campaign to bring light to the children of Nepal began.
“The amazing synchronicity of Chandra’s Magic Light, LuminAid and the people of Nepal — it all just came together.” stated Heather in an interview. Chandra’s Magic Light illustrates how two sisters, through their own determination and entrepreneurial spirit, secured a solar light. Heather’s fundraiser has been following much of the same path. The legacy of women working together, either in books or out in the real world, is certainly a staple of this fundraiser’s success.

Under the hashtags #dispeldarkness and #givelight, Heather has been spreading word of her fundraiser and is on track to reach her goal of 100 LuminAid lights sent to the NCEP by the end of June. Heather’s campaign has been widely successful and the NCEP themselves even reached out over Facebook to express their gratitude! If you’d like to help support Heather, please check out her Facebook page: HLBZ Barefoot Books.


Ignite Your Child's Love of Reading: Summer Reading and Literacy Tips from Barefoot Books Hello Parents!

I wanted to share with you my top 5 tips for helping your child fall in love with reading. You might be pleased to discover you are doing many of these things already! And if you’re not? They are easy to implement. Here goes:

1. Let your child see you reading books for pleasure

When is the last time your child saw you reading a book for pleasure? I’m talking about an actual BOOK, not your iphone, a tablet or e-reader. Ultimately children will learn more from what you actually do than what you tell them to do, and so if you want them to read for pleasure, it’s important to model this for them.

2. Create pleasurable read aloud routines

This is probably the most important thing you can do to help your child create positive associations with reading! Keep in mind that reading doesn’t need to just happen at bedtime. Consider reading aloud during dinner or bath time. Reading together not only shows children that reading is fun and valuable, but it also serves to strengthen your bond.

3. Keep a wide selection of books accessible in your home

Research shows to access to a variety of books is an important factor when it comes to keeping kids’ minds sharp over the summer. Wondering how to expand your collection so that it includes various genres? Our printable Treasure Map (North America / Europe) is a fun way to make sure you have variety in your home library. As you acquire new books, help your child learn to take good care of them.

4. Allow children to select the books they read

Children become more interested in reading when they are encouraged to select the books they read. Creating a bookshelf at baby’s level and encouraging her to pick her own stories is a great way to raise a reader for life. Some parents forgo the shelves for a basket since babies tend to want to pull every book off a shelf! Either way, storing books where little hands can reach them is a great way to spark interest in reading.

5. Schedule “quiet reading time” each day

This is a tip straight from the preschool classroom! Teach children at an early age that looking at books quietly for a small period of time every day is part of their daily home routine. Not only is it great for their literacy development, but it will also save your sanity. This is especially great for transition times when you need to keep kids occupied. For instance, you can keep a basket of books in the kitchen so that your child can have “quiet reading time” as you prepare dinner.

How do you instill a love for reading in your child? Share your tips below!

Stefanie GrossmanMore soon,

Stefanie Grossman, M.S.Ed.
Global Program Director, Barefoot Books

 

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In and out. Whisper and shout. Learning opposites is what we’re all about!

About the Book

New release Outdoor Opposites (North America | Europe) is great book for any early learner. With beautiful images and easy-to-read text, this book is a must for your bookshelf.

Grab your backpack and head into the countryside for a camping adventure full of contrasts! Little ones love to try out the opposite actions as they sing and dance along. Enhanced CD includes audio singalong and video animation. Watch as this book comes to life and join the cheerful characters in dancing to opposites with our new YouTube video.

Notables to Notice from Senior Editor, Kate DePalma:

  • Diversity – The featured children in Outdoor Opposites represent different races, genders and abilities.
  • Outdoor Play - From apple picking to camping by a fireside, kids are pictured in active play, enjoying and embracing the outdoors.
  • Seek and Find – Kids will love looking for the adorable fox on every page of this book.

Reviews of Outdoor Opposites:

  • “This book is a welcome departure from standard fare about opposites that only shows opposing words. Instead, this one offers space for conversation on similarities and differences among individual interests.” — School Library Journal
  • “Oldfield’s use of bright and sunny colors complements the multiethnic cast, drawing in the most diverse of readers…An ebullient book with catchy, rhyming text that’s fun to read again and again at home, in the classroom or under a tree.” — Kirkus Reviews

Love the illustrations by Rachel Oldfield? You’ll also love her illustrated work Up, Up, Up! from Barefoot Books. (North AmericaEurope)

Grab both beautiful works for your collection today!


Celebrate Earth Day 2015 with us – and your children – on April 22nd!

We only get one planet and it’s important to us that we treat Earth with the respect and care it deserves. We practice environmentally and socially conscious business and printing practices to personally reduce our footprint on the environment and we’ve found that practicing sustainability as a company promotes practicing sustainability individually.

The same can be true for your family! We create books that promote a culture of sustainability, green living, and a consciousness of our impact on the environment. It’s important to teach kids how they can help the planet – and these books can help. Here are our suggestions for some of our top books to share with your little ones on this important day:

Whole World

This book, accompanied by a sing along CD, reimagines the classic children’s song “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands” and contextualizes it for a modern, global audience. After reading this book, your children will feel inspired knowing that all people from all walks of life across the globe care for the environment together. We believe that it’s important to show that all cultures and people are equally invested in protecting the environment. (Buy: North America / Europe)

What’s This? A Seed’s Story

What’s more poignant than a young girl stumbling upon a seed, helping it grow throughout all of spring, and then sharing the seeds with her classmates so they can all plant sunflowers together the following spring? What’s This? will teach the values of patience and generosity just in time for children to start planting their own flowers! (Buy: North America / Europe)

The Barefoot Book of Earth Tales

To inspire children to care about the environment, it’s incredibly important to introduce them to Earth as a friend. As with any friendships, telling stories is how friendships grow. Earth Tales introduces children to many different myths and legends surrounding the creation of Earth and why things are the way they are. From Wales to Kazakhstan, many cultures are featured in this wonderful anthology of stories.
(Buy: North America / Europe)

Want to take your education a bit further? Consider doing one of these activities afterwards:

1. Skip the drive and instead walk to school, the grocery store, or the park

2. Have your child identify the recycling symbol on containers in your home and make a game out of putting them in your recycling bin

3. Plant a seed and watch as it grows – soon you’ll be able to plant it in the ground outside

4. Make signs to remind family members to turn off lights or the faucet when not in use

No matter how you choose to celebrate, teaching kids about Earth Day will be fun, educational, and a chance to make an impact on our planet. Show us how you are celebrating! Share your photos with us on our Barefoot Books Facebook page!


2 April, 2015 is International Children’s Book Day! Usually around Hans Christian Andersen’s birthday, International Children’s Book Day celebrates children’s books to inspire a love of reading and also to call attention to the power of children’s storytelling. It’s no surprise that Hans Christian Andersen, the author of many fairy tales that’ve been adapted and transformed into modern children’s stories, gets the spotlight on this day.

Fairy tales have always had a special place in children’s literature. As critically acclaimed author Neil Gaiman said, “Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” These stories—whether it’s Cinderella or Hansel and Gretel—tell children that it’s okay to be who they are and that, in the end, everything will be okay. These stories have the unique ability to deeply inspire those who read them, which is why they’ve been adapted countless times as books, plays, and movies. Their messages are timeless and are always relevant when introduced to the next generation of children.

Barefoot is so dedicated to this that we have an entire book of fairy tales collected in The Barefoot Book of Fairy Tales (NA/EU). We believe in the power of sharing fairy tales from all across the world to introduce our young readers to other cultures and experiences. We’ve collected tales from Germany, France, Ukraine, China, and more to highlight the most poignant stories we could find.

Share Your Favorite Fairy Tale

We want to share this International Children’s Book Day with you! Tell us what your favorite fairy tale is by commenting on this post or tweeting @BarefootBooks with the hashtag #MyFairyTale.

Help Us Spread The Word

If you’re celebrating the day with a child, be sure to share our International Children’s Book Day pledge! You can find the image here.