A craft to make you say “Ahhh!” Bring the friendly monsters from Grim, Grunt and Grizzle-Tail to life with a paper plate mask! While you’re creating your mask, think about a Monster Story for your own monster. How will your monster sound? Is your monster friendly or misunderstood, like Grizzle-Tail? Let your imagination shape your mask and the story to go with it. Ages 5+

WHAT TO FIND

  • Paper Plates
  • Scissors
  • Tissue paper cut into small pieces
  • Glue, tape and a stapler
  • A small bowl with some water
  • Construction paper
  • Popsicle stick
  • Any additional art supplies you have

WHAT TO DO

1. Sketch out the monster you’d like to make on a paper plate. Have an adult help you cut out holes for the eyes.

2. Put a small amount of craft glue into a dish and add water in equal parts. Stir together and paint the surface of the plate with the glue mixture. Layer your cut tissue paper onto the wet glue. Secure any loose ends or overlapping pieces with additional glue where necessary. Set aside to dry.

3. Use construction paper to cut out features for your monster, like big eyes, a nose and mouth. Create pointy teeth by cutting out lots of triangles. Add ears and horns to your creature by glueing them on the back of the plate. Use paint, pipe cleaners, puff balls and your imagination to make your monster unique.

4. Glue a popsicle stick to the bottom of your monster and reinforce with tape. Make your mask sturdier by stapling another plate to the back. Have an adult use scissors to make sure you can still see out of the eye-holes.

5. When you’re finished, walk around the house and pretend you’re a monster! Then, share your masks with us @barefootbooks on Instagram!

Ready to scare? Download the activity here.

Check out these Monster Stories perfect for the Hallowe’en season!

Meeting monsters on the page helps children realize that many of the scary things in life are less frightening than they appear — and that monsters can have feelings too! Inspire young readers with these adventures that teach courage, compassion and kindness.

Buy Grim, Grunt and Grizzle-Tail here or get the six book set and save!


From "Tales from Old Ireland" by Malachy Doyle, illustrated by Niamh Sharkey.

You can’t help but wonder at the mystery surrounding All Hallows’ Eve. From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to the upcoming Pride and Prejudice and Zombies film, Halloween has inspired popular culture for ages, spreading from Northern Europe to as far as Hong Kong!

But how did Halloween become the holiday we know today?

  • Halloween as we know it evolved from the ancient Celtic tradition of putting out treats for spirits who roamed the streets during a sacred festival that honored the dead, called “Samhain” in Ireland and “Nos Calan Gaeaf” in Wales.
  • Samhain festival-goers started dressing in ghost, witch and goblin costumes to escape the notice of real spirits wandering the streets. To this day, these remain revelers’ most popular Halloween costumes; just ask the spooks from our very own Barefoot Book of Giants, Ghosts and Goblins!
  • Jack o’ Lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed-out turnips to keep away spirits on the Samhain holiday.

From "Tales from Celtic Lands" by Caitlin Matthews, illustrated by Olwyn Whelan

  • If you’re the last one frolicking about the bonfire on Nos Calan Gaeaf, watch out! According to Welsh legend, the spirits of a giant black sow and headless woman might carry you with them back to the spirit world!
  • According to tradition, if a person wears his or her clothes inside-out and walks backwards on Halloween, he or she will see a witch at midnight.
  • Scottish girls believed they could see images of their future husband if they hung wet sheets in front of the fire on Halloween.

Not so keen on wearing your clothes inside-out or hanging wet sheets by a fire? Celebrate instead with our monstrously fun Halloween craft, spooky recipes or scary-fun books! Befriend a not-so-scary giant (above), gallant heroes, fiendish folk and more in Tales from Old Ireland.

Wishing you and your family a safe and spooktacular Halloween!


Paper Leaf Suncatcher Activity from Barefoot Books -- A perfect fall craft for kids!

This fall, decorate your windows with translucent leaves that let the sun shine through! Using office supplies and tissue paper, work with your family to create a stunning window display perfect for seasonal parties. This activity is inspired by Skip through the Seasons, which teaches us about winter, spring, summer, and fall.

Paper Leaf Suncatcher Activity from Barefoot Books -- A perfect fall craft for kids!

What You Need:

• Templates (found here)

• Tissue paper in fall colors

• Plastic sheet protectors (or contact paper)

• Scissors

• Glue

• Tape

What To Do:

Paper Leaf Suncatcher Activity from Barefoot Books -- A perfect fall craft for kids!

1. Print out the downloadable templates. Break open the sheet protectors and apply glue sparingly to one of the inside covers.

2. Tear off pieces of tissue paper and glue them down until you have covered one side. You may need to apply more glue where the tissue paper overlaps.

Paper Leaf Suncatcher Activity from Barefoot Books -- A perfect fall craft for kids! 3. Evenly apply glue to the other inside cover, then fold it over and press down firmly to sandwich the tissue paper. Let dry.

4. Tape leaf templates to the page (Note: You could do this first so you’ll see the templates as you lay down the tissue paper). Carefully cut out the leaves. Make smaller leaves with the scraps.

Paper Leaf Suncatcher Activity from Barefoot Books -- A perfect fall craft for kids!

5. Tape the leaves to your window or use string to make a mobile!

Ready to get started? Download a printable copy of these craft instructions and leaf templates here!

When you’ve finished, we’d love to see what you create! Share your photos with us on Instagram using #barefootbooks!

Skip Through The Seasons Paper Leaf Suncatcher Activity from Barefoot BooksWant to discover more about the changing seasons?

Consider our popular title Skip through the Seasons.

Whirl through the months of the year in this action packed seek-and-find book that takes young readers on an outdoor adventure as the months pass by. The detailed pictures offer a wide variety of items to spot, while also teaching the changes that happen in nature as the year turns.

Buy Now >>


Eat Your Vegetables! Using Books to Help Raise Healthy Kids

We know that parents and caregivers pay attention to providing good nutrition for their children. Raising kids with an appreciation for vegetables can can give their health, and their appreciation for the earth, an advantage. Whether you are trying to encourage your children to eat more vegetables in general or have a child who prefers a vegetarian diet, you’ll find many helpful stories and kid-friendly recipes in our collection to help raise healthy and compassionate kids.

Eat your vegetables! Books to Use to Raise Healthy KidsHerb the Vegetarian Dragon

All the dragons in the forest of Nogard like nothing better than raiding Castle Dark and carrying off princesses to eat – all the dragons, that is, except one. Herb is at his happiest tending his vegetable patch, for Herb is a vegetarian. So it is unfortunate that he is the one captured by the castle’s knights in armor. Treacherous Meathook and his dragon cronies will only help Herb if he agrees to eat meat – will he give in to their blackmail. Jules Bass’s lighthearted story combines with Debbie Harter’s jaunty illustrations to make this a hilarious picture book that also offers young readers plenty of food for thought.

Ages 5 to 7 years

Eat Your Vegetables! Using Books to Help Raise Healthy KidsThe Gigantic Turnip

Find out what happens when the old woman, the old man, and all twenty-one animals on the farm try to harvest a rather large root vegetable. This well-loved Russian tale uses humor, counting and repetition to appeal to beginner readers. Book with CD editions include story read by Ellen Verenieks.

Ages 3 to 7 years

Eat Your Vegetables! Using Books to Help Raise Healthy KidsWhat’s This? A Seed’s Story

Learn the basics of how plants grow in this springtime story. When a young girl plants a seed, she learns she must be patient to achieve results. She is rewarded by a beautiful sunflower, and brings her flower to school to share the seeds with her entire class. Includes notes about roots, shoots, flowers and
seeds.

Ages 3 to 7 years

Eat Your Vegetables! Using Books to Help Raise Healthy KidsKids’ Kitchen

Encourage budding chefs to create tasty meals with 40 laminated recipe cards that feature nutritious vegetarian dishes from around the world. Unique recipes ranging from the familiar to the exotic are divided into five color-coded categories to reflect the major food groups. Simple step-by-step instructions put kids in control as they learn that cooking is more than an art — it’s a science! Includes 8-page booklet with information on nutrition, kitchen safety and terminology.

For all ages

No matter which stories you choose to share, remember: If you’re reaching for lots of vegetables, your kids will likely take them too.


The Enduring Power of Fairytales for Kids

“If you want your kids to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.”

—Albert Einstein

Fairy tales, of course, have been with us for a long time. Sharing them is a tradition often passed down from one generation to another, but did you know the power that these stories can have on children?

Fairy Tales Show Kids How to Handle Problems

We learn from the characters in stories, even as adults. They help us because we connect to our own lives, dreams, anxieties, and consider what we would do in their shoes. Fairy tales help children learn how to navigate life.

Fairy Tales Build Emotional Resiliency

Fairy tales show real life issues in a fantastical scenario where most often the hero triumphs. They allow children to discover in a safe environment that no one in life is immune from challenges.

Fairy Tales Cross Cultural Boundaries

Many cultures share common fairy tales like Cinderella, with their own cultural flavor. We read the versions and know we all share something important, the need to make sense of life with story, and the hope for good to triumph over evil.

Fairy Tales Teach Story

Fairy tales are understanding the basics of story — setting, characters, and plot (rising action, climax, and resolution) as well as the difference between fiction and non-fiction. Once a child understands story, it supports his ability to make predictions and comprehend other stories he’s reading.

Fairy Tales Give Parents Opportunities to Teach Critical Thinking Skills

Perhaps you disagree with a message in a fairy tale. Reading that fairy tale is the perfect opportunity to open the discussion with your kids. Exposure to different ideas and guided conversations help your kids learn to evaluate what they read and think for themselves.

Host a Party with a Purpose!

Fairytales and Cocktails Party is a grown-ups only gathering that promises delightful drinks, stress-free shopping and scintillating conversation!

We’ll talk more about why fairy tales have endured and are still so valuable for children today. Your experienced Ambassador can make personalized suggestions for Barefoot books and gifts that will delight the kids in your guests’ lives. Go ahead and treat yourself and your friends to a fabulous girls’ night out with your Barefoot Books Ambassador.


It’s never too early to start taking the first steps toward literacy! Early exposure to language through reading, talking and singing has such a profound influence on children’s learning through life that the American Academy of Pediatrics now requires pediatricians to “prescribe” reading from birth.

So what types of books are best for babies? Here’s our research-based roundup:

Board Books

  • You’ve probably noticed that many books for babies come in this format. Why? Babies are still developing control of their fingers, and the stiff pages are easier to manipulate than paper pages. These sturdy books also withstand mouthing from babies and toddlers, which is a primary way they explore the world. (They do this because the nerve endings in their mouths are more sensitive than those in their fingers at this age!)

High Contrast Books

  • Babies’ developing brains are tasked with processing a lot of information! Research shows that focusing on simple, high-contrast images allows babies’ brains to rest and helps prevent overstimulation. Babies prefer to look at black and white images, bold colors, and photographs of faces.

Books for Active Reading

  • Almost any book can be made interactive, but certain books build it right in to their structure! Look for books that encourage toddlers to seek, count, name objects, answer questions, and make predictions. All of these activities build attention span and critical thinking skills, which are important foundational abilities for later academic learning.

Books with Repeating Text

  • Ever notice that baby books can be kind of….repetitive? This is intentional! Books with predictable, repeating text (often rhyming text) expose babies to the patterns of language and them to anticipate what is coming next. In addition to building vocabulary and memory skills, these books involve children as they grow by empowering them to join you in “reading” the repeated words.

Singalongs

  • Listening to you singing rhyming and repeated text helps build your baby’s early language skills. Plus, many of these songs encourage movement and gross motor practice.

Research also shows that keeping a wide variety of books within children’s reach encourages a love for books and reading. Let them choose what you read from the earliest age, and – most of all – enjoy the time together!


Do Something Grand for Grandparents: Unique Gift Ideas for KidsTo celebrate Grandparent’s Day on September 13, we asked our community for inspiration and ideas for gifts that kids can create or do for grandparents.

We hope you enjoy this fantastic advice from the Barefoot community!

A Fun Take on Flowers:
Team Leader Tiffany says, “It’s always a nice gesture to receive flowers, but given that children love to craft – how about they craft some flowers using tissue paper, glitter, felt, pipe sticks, etc. This way, the grandparents get to keep them all year long!”

An Actual Family Tree:
Work with your child to craft a tree – an actual family tree! This could be great for older kids who can write names and so forth and stick them on the branches. If you want to go 3-D, use family photos on each brand instead.

Musical Memories:
Put together a playlist with songs from their grandparents school years and have a dance party with them. This gift is one that continues to give as kids can dance to this soundtrack all year long when visiting grandparents.

Lasting Communications:
Consider starting a pen pal relationship between grandparent and child, even if they are close by. Snail mail is fun for all ages. Have children write about what they did that day and ask how grandparents used to spend their day. Ambassador Lisa says, “My kids do it with their great grandmother and both sides love it!”

Send a Hug:
Too far away to see each other? Trace a drawing of your kiddos with arms spread wide onto butcher or rolled paper. Have them decorate with a cute message and mail so that grandparents can have a “hug” whenever needed.

Fun in Video Form:
Kids can create a skit or sing a song for their grandparents and send the video. Or, if you have an early reader, Team Leader Dena suggests having them read a book on video about grandparents and send to share.

What advice do you have for celebrating grandparents?
Please share your ideas in the comments!

Looking for more gift ideas? Meet grandparents of all kinds in these Barefoot stories:

My Granny Went to Market
Fly away with Granny as she takes a magic carpet ride around the world, collecting a steadily increasing number of souvenirs from each exotic location! This rhyming story will take young readers on an adventure to different countries while teaching them to count along the way.

The Journey Home from Grandpa’s
Hop in the yellow car and look out for all the other forms of transportation on the way home from Grandpa’s. A beautiful, double-page spread at the end features all of the colors and modes of transportation from the story.

Give the gift of time together: Include the puzzle for more quality time between child and grandparent!

Grandpa's Garden | Barefoot BooksGrandpa’s Garden
This beautifully told story follows Billy from early spring to late summer as he helps his grandpa on his vegetable patch. They dig the hard ground, sow rows of seeds, and keep them watered and safe from slugs. When harvest time arrives they can pick all the vegetables and fruit they have grown. Children will be drawn in by the poetry of the language and the warm illustrations, while also catching the excitement of watching things grow!

Emily’s Tiger
Watch out – Emily is off and running again! This little girl has a problem with her temper, and every time she gets angry she turns into quite the little tiger. This quirky picture book addresses behavioral issues with humor and an emphasis on intergenerational relationships.

Elephant Dance
Listen along with Ravi to Grandfather’s captivating stories about India, where the sun is like a ferocious tiger and monsoon rains cascade like waterfalls. Notes after the story include facts about India’s animals, food, culture and religion, and a simple elephant dance music score.


Tackle Math with The Real Princess | A Children's Book from Barefoot Books

Math is often a scary monster for kids — difficult and hard to understand, yet crucial in early childhood.

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) agree that an accessible and engaging mathematics education in early childhood is a vital foundation for future mathematical understanding and learning in general.

A lack of confidence and an unwillingness to participate can develop if your child does not become comfortable with math at an early age. This can lead to them believing that they are “bad at math” and thrust them into a self-fulfilling cycle of failure. Research shows that:

  • The brain is most receptive to learning math and logic between the ages of 1 and 4.
  • Success in early math skills also predicts later reading achievement.
  • The most critical brain development occurs in the first few years of life — it is important to capitalize on these early stages to help develop children’s learning abilities.
  • Exploration and curiosity are the foundations of math, science and early learning.

As parents, how can you help engage your child in math while creating an exciting and memorable experience?

An important aspect is compounding fun reading with “hidden” math learning — your child will be having so much fun, they won’t even realize they are learning math! On average, children who are participating in hands-on activities establish a deeper understanding of the concepts and return more readily for future engagement. Tangible representations of numbers and patterns give your child something easy and fun to remember while simultaneously increasing comprehension.

Tackle Math with The Real Princess | A Children's Book from Barefoot BooksA colorful and fantastical twist on The Princess and the Pea, The Real Princess: A Mathemagical Tale (North America | Europe) is a perfect addition to any at-home math encouragement. The book follows the tale of a numerically inclined royal family, and their pursuit to find equally worthy (and math oriented) princesses to marry their sons.  What better way to fight off the math monster than with a brave princess?

Included in the back of the book is an inviting and relevant math activity, that sends you counting back through the book and is guaranteed to keep your child engaged. This counting activity also features an answer sheet, which can be found online: Counting Activity and Answer Key.

That’s not all! Another hands-on activity can be found online to make Princess Collage Feather Beds. This arts and crafts project can be a vibrant memento to hang up as a reminder of all that your child has accomplished and learned from A Mathemagical Tale.

What are you doing to fight the math monster?


Practice Yoga with Kids to Improve Patience and Increase Confidence

Confidence, patience and both mental and physical balance are some of the most important skills for children to learn while they grow, and yet are also some of the most difficult to teach. How can parents even begin to explain such broad and complex concepts, while still keeping their kids engaged? Body and mind awareness can be achieved however, through one all-encompassing activity — yoga!

Experts agree that starting yoga at a young age helps to develop skills that will serve your children their entire lives. Body control and self-induced calmness can soothe tantrums, help fussy bedtimes and make kids more agile and balanced on their feet.

Yoga incorporates play, exercise and connecting with inner feelings all in one! It can teach children how to relieve stress in a healthy and positive way, while also providing a fun and interesting new activity. PBS kids has comprised a few examples of why yoga is so great for kids:

xxxx1. Yoga teaches us about our bodies. When we practice the physical postures or exercises (called asanas), we learn how to move more freely and with greater ease and awareness. These postures help our bodies become strong and flexible. Yoga is also a great way to teach children how to take care of themselves and their bodies! It teaches us to listen to our bodies by modifying or changing poses that are too hard or cause pain.

xxxx2. Yoga teaches us how to use our energy more effectively. When we practice yoga, we learn how to use the life force energy in our bodies (called prana) to feel more relaxed, focused, or motivated. It helps us breathe better too— when we breathe deeply and fully (called pranayama) we become more aware, and we can bring peacefulness or energy to our bodies.

xxxx3. Yoga teaches us how to quiet the mind. When we practice yoga, we learn how to be still. This helps us to listen with attention and make good decisions. As with all forms of exercise, a good yoga practice can mean a good night’s sleep!

xxxx4. Yoga teaches us about balance. When we practice yoga, we learn to be more aware about the need for balance in our lives. This could mean equal stretching on the left and right sides of our bodies or making sure we balance our very busy time with equal quiet time and relaxation.

Having a visual aid is a great tool to help your children easily comprehend and get excited about yoga! Check out some of our yoga oriented products to encourage the namaste lifestyle with your children.

My Daddy is a Pretzel

NAPRA Nautilus award finalist, My Daddy is a Pretzel), is the perfect way to engage kids in yoga. Follow a group of children as they discuss their parent’s occupations, while comparing them to different poses. Each pose emphasizes a certain skill and gives step by step instructions on how to safely achieve them. A light-hearted look at yoga, yet one with a lasting message, My Daddy is a Pretzel is a wonderful introduction to yoga for readers of all shapes and sizes.

Yoga Pretzels

Inspired by the book is the unique card collection of yoga activities, Yoga Pretzels. Featuring 50 different yoga activities for kids and grownups, each card is beautifully illustrated and easy to understand. Pick randomly or follow the color coded categories for partner poses, breathing exercises, balancing and much more!

Yoga CD

Perfect for mediating or practicing your poses, Barefoot’s Yoga CD ) features 14 soothing tracks composed by a diverse group of world renowned artists. Play it while your little ones read before bedtime, or while they are stretching and controlling their breathe with Yoga Pretzels!

Interested in trying this out?
Download 4 FREE activities from our best selling deck, Yoga Pretzels!


Types of Literacy and Why You Should Care | Emotional and Cultural Literacy | Barefoot BooksWhen you hear the word “literacy” what comes to mind?

Most likely, books and the ability to read and write. This type of “book” literacy is hugely important, as we know, but as much as we want our children to be book literate and academically successful, we are also concerned about our children’s character development. What kind of people will they grow up to be? We want them to be caring and socially conscious citizens of the world: self-confident, curious and compassionate.

This is where two additional types of literacy come in: emotional literacy and cultural literacy. We’ve pulled together a list of books that will help you cultivate cultural literacy and a list of books that foster emotional literacy. Many of the books on these lists support both.

And, of course, reading these books with your kids will support “book” literacy as well!

Cultural Literacy and Books to Help

Research shows that children often draw incorrect conclusions about other cultures, and that it’s important for adults to gently correct such misconceptions and challenge stereotypes through open conversation. Sharing diverse stories like these from around the world is a great way to start a conversation about diversity.

My Granny Went to Market (ages 3-7)
This rhyming story will take young readers on an adventure to different countries while teaching them to count along the way.

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush (ages 3-7)
Follow four children from different countries, each going through their early morning routine and getting ready for school. See the different ways of life in Europe, Africa, India and China.

Off We Go To Mexico | Barefoot BooksOff We Go to Mexico (ages 4-10)
Trek to native villages and sing and dance to the music of Mariachi bands. Along the way, you can learn Spanish words and phrases and discover Mexican culture. (Also available in Spanish!)

We’re Sailing Down the Nile (ages 4-10)
Set sail along the mighty Nile River. The rhyming story is followed by eleven pages full of educational information about ancient Egypt, gods and goddesses, a helpful map, and much more.

We All Went on Safari (ages 4-10)
Set out on a counting journey through the grasslands of Tanzania. The lively, rhyming text is accompanied by an illustrated guide to counting in Swahili, a map, notes about animals, and interesting facts about Tanzania and the Maasai people. (Spanish and French formats available!)

The Barefoot Book of Jewish Tales (ages 7+)
This engaging collection includes eight delightful tales from the Jewish tradition. Each story has been chosen for its appeal to families and each has a simple — yet powerful — message.

The Barefoot Book of Buddhist Tales (ages 6+)
Explore numerous tales from the folk traditions of countries including India, China, Japan and Tibet. This is a collection of enthralling stories illustrates various important aspects of Buddhist thought.

The Great Race (ages 4-9)
Race with the animals of the Zodiac as they compete to have the years of the Chinese calendar named after them. The excitement-filled story is followed by notes on the Chinese calendar, important Chinese holidays, and a chart outlining the animal signs based on birth years.

Lin Yi's Lantern | Barefoot BooksLin Yi’s Lantern (ages 5-9)
This heartwarming story shows the rewards of putting others first, and includes educational notes at the end about the Chinese moon festival, life in rural China, and the legend of the moon fairy.

Mama Panya’s Pancakes (ages 4-10)
On market day, Mama Panya’s son Adika invites everyone he sees to a pancake dinner. How will Mama Panya ever feed them all? This clever and heartwarming story about Kenyan village life teaches the importance of sharing, even when you have little to give.

Barefoot Books World Atlas (all ages)
This is the atlas for twenty-first-century readers. It’s packed with information about the way in which communities and cultures around the world have been shaped by their local environments, and it looks at the ideas and initiatives that are shaping the future.

The Barefoot World Atlas app for iPad is also available.

Learn more about our World Cultures books and take the kids in your life on an imaginary journey around the world!

Emotional Literacy and Books to Help

Through books and thoughtful discussions, we can help children feel confident in their unique identities, identify and express their feelings, and develop empathy towards others. Like reading, math or science, emotional literacy can be taught, but it’s not a quick and easy process. This area needs to be addressed regularly, like any other academic area we care about.

Ruby’s Baby Brother (ages 3-7)
Ruby’s mom is having a baby, but Ruby is not very happy about it. When baby
Leon comes along, will she change her mind about having a baby brother? (Available in Spanish!)

Ruby's Sleepover | Barefoot BooksRuby’s Sleepover (ages 3-7)
Ruby and Mai are camping out in the backyard. As the night draws in, all sorts of scary characters head towards their tent. Luckily, Ruby has some magical objects in her backpack, but will they be enough to keep the girls safe and fight their fears?

Emily’s Tiger (ages 3-7)
This little girl has a problem with her temper, and every time she gets angry she turns into quite the little tiger. This quirky picture book addresses behavioral issues with humor and an emphasis on intergenerational relationships.

Herb the Vegetarian Dragon (ages 4-10)
Herb is captured by the castle’s knights in armor. Treacherous Meathook and his dragon cronies will only help if Herb, a vegetarian, agrees to eat meat. Will he give in to their blackmail and bullying?

The Boy Who Grew Flowers (ages 4-10)
Climb to the top of Lonesome Mountain to meet a very special boy named Rink — every full moon, he grows flowers all over his body. This heartwarming story celebrates difference and friendship, as Rink meets a girl with her own secret, and they discover ways to help each other.

Chandra’s Magic Light (ages 6-10)
A heartwarming story set in Nepal of two resourceful sisters who bring the safety of solar-powered light to their family. This story provides an introduction to Nepali village culture, environmental science and feminism.

The Girl with the Brave Heart | Barefoot BooksThe Girl with a Brave Heart (ages 4-10)
Shiraz, a kindhearted young girl growing up in Tehran, has a miserable life at home with her stepmother and stepsister, who treat her like a servant. When the wind blows Shiraz’s ball of wool into the garden next door, she spends the day helping and caring for the old lady who lives there, with miraculous results.

Lola’s Fandango (ages 4-10)
Lola is a young Spanish girl in awe of her glamorous older sister. However, she discovers her own talent and duende, or spirit, through secret fandango lessons from her father. The text is infused with the rhythms, movements and sounds of the dance.

Learn more about our books that boost Social Emotional Learning.

 

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